Social Norms & Market Norms

As behavioral economist Dan Ariely notes in his book, Predictably Irrational, we live simultaneously in two worlds; one ruled by social norms, and the other determined by market norms. If you hire a professional designer to develop a website for you, they  expect to be paid in cash. If they invite you to Thanksgiving dinner, it would  be inappropriate to offer them $200 for the wonderful meal! Bringing a dessert or a bottle of wine and offering to help clean up would fit the social norm.

Social Networks are, well, Social…

Online social networks arise spontaneously and are built on trust. Permission to join a network and share your art, requires an understanding of that community’s purpose and rules. People connect online out of a need to be acknowledged; to stay in touch with friends and loved ones, express themselves, create, have fun, show off a bit and share opinions. Before you start talking about your business, your next gig, or your latest album, ask yourself what the network values.

What have you learned about the online communities you participate in? What  contributions have gotten the conversation going?

Book Review: The Network is Your Customer – 5 Strategies to Thrive in a Digital Age

Book Review: The Network is Your Customer – 5 Strategies to Thrive in a Digital Age by David L. Rogers (@David_Rogers )

When I first picked up this book by David Rogers, (a professor at Columbia Business School), I thought it was yet another introduction to social communication technologies for wary corporate managers. Boy, was I wrong!

What’s different…

  • Rather than organizing the book around the use of specific social communication tools or an examination of the general theory of disruptive social technologies, Rogers builds his book around the behaviors and needs of customer networks. The title is quite apt.
  • The writing is accessible and the book is very well organized and designed to be practical. The first two chapters explain the dynamics of customer networks and social communication technologies. Each of the 5 behaviors he identifies are examined in their own chapters and multiple strategies are presented. Next, Rogers dedicates a chapter to a specific planning and implementation process that will help businesses apply these ideas to their specific situations. He then asks the questions, “What will the organization of the future look like?”and “How do we create an organization that is not just customer-focused, but customer-network focused?” Finally, he systematically reviews each of the strategies in the book, by asking a series of questions in a ‘Self-Assessment Quiz’. Inquiry is a powerful technique for self-reflection, personalizing the ideas presented here.
  • There are well over 100 case studies spread throughout the book. Companies are listed in an Appendix, sorted by industry. Each case study specifically illustrates the strategy Rogers is describing. This is an effective approach that makes it very easy to ‘try on’ techniques with your organization. As I was reading the book I found myself taking these case studies and translating them for my clients.

The Big Idea

Rogers suggests 5 Strategies that any business can use to create new value by harnessing the power of customer networks:

  1. ACCESS – be faster, easier, everywhere, and always on
  2. ENGAGE – become a trusted source of great content
  3. CUSTOMIZE – make everything you offer adaptable to your customer’s needs
  4. CONNECT – become part of your customer’s conversations
  5. COLLABORATE – involve your customers at every stage of your enterprise.

There is a lot here; much more than an explanation of disruptive technology. Rogers provides a road map, demonstrating techniques that will tap the power of customer networks, regardless of your industry or the size of your company. Recommended!

Quote Of The Day: from Clay Shirky’s ‘Cognitive Surplus’

“The dramatically reduced cost of public address, and the dramatically increased size of the population wired together, means that we can now turn massive aggregations of small contributions into things of lasting value.” -Clay Shirky, “Cognitive Surplus” p. 161

Social Media Marketing: Is This Really a Conversation?

Social media is hyped as a powerful tool for ‘connecting’ with your audience. While the technology creates this potential, my experience has been that most social media usage is essentially one-way, direct mail. 
There are many people I have relationships with in the ‘real’ world whose communications with me via Facebook, email, Twitter, etc. are unsolicited self-promotion, certainly not a ‘conversation’. This can be annoying, and the net effect is to reduce the level of trust and credibility. When I receive unsolicited promotional material from strangers I immediately cross them off the list.
When we opt-in we intentionally agree to accept ongoing promotional blasts but we can always unsubscribe if these communications don’t add value. 
An authentic conversation adds value in both directions. The real question to ask yourself is, “How can I help you?” 
If a band or artist I follow comments on a post of mine it means something, and of course it works the other way around. 
Before you hit the ‘Send’ button think about what you are really giving to your audience.

Dave Holland..a true jazz legend..check out his new website!

Dave Holland, the master jazz bass player, composer, and band leader has a new website:

http://www.daveholland.com/  

Check it out. Take a look around. There is some great stuff here. Extra kudos to Dave for kickin’ it on the web and really digging into the power of social networking…