NARM 2011 Panel: The New World of Artist Management

Panel hosted by Tamara Conniff – TheComet.com

Panelists:

Video link

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NARM 2011 – Panel: Direct To Fan & Email Marketing

NARM 2011 Music Business Crash Course panel discussing Direct-To-Fan and Email Marketing. Panel moderated by Bill Wilson, NARM‘s VP of Biz Dev and Digital Strategy:

Phil Antoniades, President of Nimbit

Jason Fischer, Director of New Media, Epitath

Bob Moczydlowsky, VP of Product & Marketing at Topspin Media

Lou Plaia, co-founder of ReverbNation

Video link here. Embedded video below:

NARM 2011 – Panel: Outsourcing for Knowledge and Profits

Outsourcing panel from NARM/A2IM Music Business Crash Course produced by Rich Bengloff.

Panelists:

David Macias (Thirty Tigers), Sibley Verback (StreamJam/Electric Sheep Company), Rob Weitzner (Consolidated Independent), Alicia Yafee (The Spellbound Group), and moderator Adam Rabinovitz (IODA)

NARM 2011 – Artist/Producer panel

NARM/A2IM Music Business Crash Course, produced by Rich Bengloff

Artist/Producer panel moderated by Ted Cohen with Artist Colin Hay (Compass Records, Men at Work), Producer Mike Clink (Aerosmith, Guns & Roses, Metallica, Sarah Kelly),  Garry West, co-founder of Compass Records, and DJ Nu-Mark of Jurrassic 5.

This diverse panel discusses the current state of music recording and  marketing.

Mike King’s Direct-To-Fan Marketing Presentation, NARM 2011

This is a fantastic introduction to best practices for online, direct-to-fan marketing, presented by Berkleemusic instructor Mike King at NARM 2011. A must-see for musicians and anyone working to engage fans or develop a social media strategy for their business.

Video link: NARM video recap Embedded video below:

Back office efficiencies in the digital music supply chain

In this Music Ally blog post from October 2010, Martin Redington of Microgen, discusses the state of data management and back-end systems in the digital music supply chain.

Identifying and paying the multiple rights holders for each download or stream requires managing vast amounts of data in multiple formats. The lack of a uniform standard for identifying artists, tracks, and recordings presents a major roadblock. This complex process is labor intensive and prone to error.

The current state of affairs causes delayed payment to artists, and if standards are not introduced to increase efficiency, the entire digital music distribution chain is at risk.

Redington calls for:

  • The creation of a standardized universal database and the business model to support its development.
  • Agreement as to how this database will be populated. Stakeholders currently have no clearly defined financial incentive to share their data with competitors.
  • Standards for exchanging information.
  • Streamlined back-office processes that will serve the future growth of the digital music industry.

You can read the full post here.

Tom Crawford, Sr. VP of Microgen, will be speaking at the NARM convention in Los Angeles, May 12, 2011 about the challenges and business opportunities presented by digital media distribution.

A fresh look at Artist-to-Audience Communication

In this video clip from the recent Rethink Music conference in Boston, KU’s Nancy Baym (see her new blog: Online Fandom) makes the point that artist – fan collaborations are creating  economic transactions that aren’t generally factored into discussions about declining music revenues.

There’s a lot of work that doesn’t have to get done anymore because audiences do it…fans want to help – Nancy Baym

Addressing the disruption of media release cycles

A huge challenge for media companies today is the disruption of the release cycle created by the Web.

Records are routinely leaked before their official distribution date. The financial risk for film studios is even more devastating, as Eric Garland points out in an interview with CNET News. A carefully planned and staggered release schedule is not only a revenue driver, but can be a huge part of the emotional impact of music and film. As Garland points out, once a product hits the Web prior to it’s release date, it’s buzz is largely neutralized regardless of the quality of the work.

This raises several important questions:

Does the audience have too much power?

How does this change not only the business reality for content owners, but also the nature of the relationship between artists and fans?

What can companies do to adapt? The music business has tried for years to dig in and hold on to their old models. We have a pretty good idea how that is turning out.

As Larry Kramer says, fans demand greater access to content, have an increasing sense of entitlement, and more choices than ever, including the choice not to commit.

Artists are approaching this in different ways. Guitarist Bill Frisell recently changed record labels so that he could accelerate his release schedule. He is also selling a series of live board tapes (in MP3 and Hi-Res formats) that augment his official label releases. This is a great solution for busy jazz musicians who are continually involved in multiple projects and create amazing music every day. Their output is not easily channeled into the typical once or twice a year record release schedule. Companies like Aderra are recording shows and selling to fans in an interactive format at the venue.

These approaches work for some artists but not others.The scale of the film industry creates an entirely new dimension to this challenge.

What are your thoughts?

How can musicians, record labels, and film studios maintain control of their distribution strategies while strengthening their relationship with fans?

Join the discussion!